~ Talmud ~


Editor's Note

Author's Dedication



Description Of The Talmud

List Of Talmudic Books


The Names Of Christ

The Life Of Christ/The Christian Cross

The Teachings Of Christ

The Names Of Christians

What The Talmud Teaches About Christians

Christian Worship

Christians Unworthy To Associate With Jews

Christians Are Unclean

Christians Are Idolaters

Christians Are Evil

Christians To Be Harmed Indirectly

Christians To Be Harmed Directly

Appendix - How The Pope Treated The Jews

Catholic News

The Holy Mass

Rosary in Latin

Gregory XVII "Siri" The Pope in Red

Who "Pulled" 911

The Coming Great Catholic Monarch

St. John Bosco's Dream (Vision) of Hell

Examination of Conscience

Antichrist (Catholic Prophecy)

Catholic Prayer

Infant Baptism in Emergency

Catholic Podcasts

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Many passages in the Talmudic books treat of the birth, life, death and teachings of Jesus Christ. He is not always referred to by the same name, however, but is diversely called "That Man," "A Certain One," "The Carpenter's Son," "The One Who Was Hanged," etc.

1. The real name of Christ in Hebrew is Jeschua Hanotsri—Jesus the Nazarene. He is called Notsri from the city of Nazareth in which he was brought up. Thus in the Talmud Christians also are called Notsrim—Nazarenes.

Since the word Jeschua means "Savior," the name Jesus rarely occurs in Jewish books.(1) It is almost always abbreviated to Jeschu, which is maliciously taken as if it were composed of the initial letters of the three words Immach SCHemo Vezikro—"May his name and memory be blotted out."(2)

(1) ex. gr. in Maiene ieschua, fol. 66b
(2) cf. I. Buxtorf in Abbrev. Jeschu: "The Jews among themselves do not say Jeschu, but Isschu, so nearly corresponding to the words of this curse. When talking to a certain Jew about this some years ago he told me that it not only meant this, but also Jeschu Scheker (liar) Utoebah (and abomination). Who would not be deeply horrified at this? This Jew lived at Frankfort and at Hanover and had travelled all over the world. When he saw how this horrified me, his faith in Judaism began to weaken, for he was not adverse to the Christian faith and had often discussed it with me and Dr. Amando Polano. I also discovered here and there two other secret words from the Jewish Cabala which have to do with this name. It is well known that the Israelites are often warned in their sacred writings to shun the worship of Elohe Nekhar—strange gods or god. What does Elohe Nekhar really mean? By the numbering method of the Gammatria these letters equal 316, which taken together make the word Jeschu. This is found at the end of the book Abhkath Rokhel. They therefore teach that to dishonor God by the worship of Elohe Nekhar is the same as to dishonor him by the worship of Jeschu. Behold the malice of the serpent! Antonius also found a marginal note in a book about the Jewish faith and religion. In a Jewish prayer book there is a certain prayer beginning with Alenu... Formerly the wording contained certain things which were afterwards deleted for fear of the Christians, but the space remains vacant to warn children and adults that something is omitted there. The deleted words were hammischtachavim lehebhel varik umitpallelim lelo ioschia "Those who bow down exhibit vanity and foolishness and adore him who cannot save." This is generally said about idols, but is secretly meant for Jesus whose name is here signified by the letters..."

2. In the Talmud Christ is called Otho Isch—'That man,' i.e. the one who is known to all. In the tract Abhodah Zarah, 6a, we read:

"He is called a Christian who follows the false teachings of that man, who taught them to celebrate the feast on the first day of the Sabbath, that is, to worship on the first day after the Sabbath"

3. Elsewhere he is simply called Peloni—"A Certain One." In Chagigah, 4b, we read:

"Mary...the mother of a certain one, of whom it is related in Schabbath..." (104b)

That this Mary is none other than the mother of Jesus will be shown later.

4. Out of contempt, Jesus is also called Naggar bar naggar—'the carpenter son of a carpenter',(3) also Ben charsch etaim—'the son of a wood worker.'

(3) cf. Abhodah Zarah, 50b.

5. He is also called Talui—'the one who was hanged.' Rabbi Samuel, the son of Meir, in the Hilch. Akum of Maimonides, refers to the fact that it was forbidden to take part in the Christian feasts of Christmas and Easter because they were celebrated on account of him who was hanged. And Rabbi Aben Ezra, in a commentary on Genes.(XXVII, 39) also calls him Talui, whose image the Emperor Constantine reproduced on his banner. "...in the days of Constantine, who made a change of religion and placed the figure of the one who was hanged on his banner."

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